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Brasserie Bernard: Eat well in the heart of Outremont

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Brasserie Bernard opened its doors in 2013. While the restaurant’s beginnings were fairly quiet, the establishment is now almost always full and much appreciated by neighbourhood residents. Brasserie Bernard lends itself perfectly to unpretentious evenings over a good plate of comfort food.

The owners of Brasserie Bernard are well known in the city’s restaurant industry. The Holder brothers – Paul, Maurice and Richard – are behind many Montreal restaurants, including the eponymous Holder. Richard also owns the Majestique, the Waverly and the Darling, with Paul and Maurice as partners. The Brasserie took over the location of the former Moulerie, which had been a fixture on Bernard Avenue for 20 years.

In its Parisian brasserie style, the Brasserie Bernard owes part of the charm of its space to the services of the talented designer Luc Laporte. The style of which deliberately emulates Holder, a nod to the owner as well as the style of the restaurant. The restaurant is divided into two sections; a dining room of 80 seats and a lobby and bar area of about 20 seats. The dominant colour is a yellowish beige in almost the entire upper part of the restaurant. On the floor level and at mid-height, the Brasserie uses darker colours to contrast the colour schemes. Brasserie Bernard’s lighting fixtures are also yellow, offering a warm ambiance to the space. The name of the brewery, in gold and green lettering, crowns the whole thing, completing a visual journey to a Parisian brasserie of yesteryear. The atmosphere here is rather quiet; in fact, the address is on our list of restaurants where one can hear oneself talk.

The dishes savoured here were created by chef Alexandre Fortier who prepares a cuisine that, like the decor, borrows from the French style while retaining a homegrown identity. The menu remains relatively fixed, with one dish on the list changing regularly. “We’re looking for stability in the consistency and quality of our products and dishes,” says Frédéric Roy, manager of the restaurant. Brasserie Bernard’s cuisine takes advantage of the great classics while adding an original touch. The dishes are based on comfort food, to which they add an extra level of culinary quality. You can savour these classics, but also comforting marinière mussels, satisfying salmon or beef tartare, very good fish & chips, and an interesting choice of quality meats, to name but a few. Besides the classics, the Brasserie also prepares dishes such as veal liver and duck. This is refined, feel-good cuisine. Note that on Monday nights, the brasserie offers $1 oysters!

To accompany your meal, sommelier Alexis Stradin has put together a delicious wine list. Brasserie Bernard also has a bar license, which means it’s one of the only places on Bernard Avenue where you can come in simply for a drink.

Brasserie Bernard is the perfect place for a nice lunch, combining delicious food with a friendly atmosphere. The place is also ideal for a nice and quiet evening.


Photography by Brasserie Bernard





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